Recent Online Trainings

Recent Online Trainings (2013-2014 Academic Year through Current)

The NCHERM Group Model Code Project Online Training Series (free of charge)

The NCHERM Group Online Trainings is endeavors to provide quality, distance learning education and discussion opportunities to colleges and universities across the country and around the world. The NCHERM Group and its affiliated associations, SCOPEATIXA and NaBITA, have identified experts from numerous fields to bring you quality online programs that address the most pressing needs in threat assessment, prevention education, sexual assault response, higher education legal issues, administrative best practices and risk management.

Recent Online Trainings (2013-2014 Academic Year through Current)

Fall 2017

Five Tips for Working With Closed Communities
Common Report Writing Errors in Title IX & Civil Rights Investigations

Summer 2017

Transitions in Higher Education: Issues and Best Practices to Support Transgender and Non-Binary Students in Higher Education
Beyond Yes/No: Queer, Trans and Kink Perspectives on Sexual Consent

Spring 2017

A Deep Dive on Mandated Reporting Do’s and Don’ts
Whats in a Name: The Role Counselors, Advisors, and Clinicians Play on Campus
Coaching for the BIT Chair
Key Components of an Online BIT

Spring and Summer 2016

Title IX and Transgender Issues
Implementing BITs Across a Multi-Campus Institution
Breaking Down Silos in Case Management
Preventing Burnout by Fostering Compassion Satisfaction among Title IX Administrators
Campus Survivor Advocacy

Fall 2015

Best Practices in Retaining Community College Students to Graduation
Conducting Hazing Investigations
Developing and Assessing BIT Structure and Function: An Online Discussion
Consent and Blackouts: The Legal, Psychological and Prevention Perspectives
Title IX Investigations and Technology: Eight Emerging and Common Issues

Summer 2015

Creating, Implementing and Applying Climate Surveys
Key Issues Facing Community Colleges

Spring 2015

How to Advertise your BIT
Addressing Microaggression and Cultural Issues on the BIT
Implementing the One Policy, One Process Model
Counseling and Community Colleges: Doing it Well

Fall 2014

BIT and Case Management Notes: 101
Best Practices in Program Evaluation
Navigating the Intersection of FERPA & Title IX
Addressing Risk Management in Study Abroad Programs
How To Manage, Supervise & Energize Difficult Staff: A Proactive Approach
When Social Media & Title IX Collide: What Colleges Need To Know About Gossip Sites, Free Speech & Proactive Policies
Federal Changes In Policy Concerning Suicidal & Dangerous Students: A Review Of Three Legal Cases

Summer 2014

Policing the Drunken Campus Hook-Up: Law, Policy and Best Practices
International Student Arrival: Preparing Your Campus’s Faculty and Staff
Update on Title IX and Compliance
Separating Dangerousness from Anger: Assessing True Threat
Issues of Gender Violence in LGBT Communities
Responding to a Student Death
Managing Faculty and Staff Expectations Following a BIT Intervention
Addressing Title IX Matters in an Online Environment
Generational Diversity: Managing Across Generations
Getting Them Here, Keeping Them Here: Best Practices in Retaining Students to Graduation
Complying with the Campus SaVE Act Through Ongoing Educational Campaigns: Prevention Through Positive Media Messages
Update on the NaBITA Tool: What’s New?

Spring 2014

Post-Vention and Suicide Response
The Role of Mental Health Professionals on the BIT
Air Traffic Control for Helicopter Parents
Hosting Minors on Campus: What You Need to Know
Fighting Mid-Semester Burnout and Stress
Ten Practical Ways to Reduce Liability for Suicidal Students on Campus
Addressing Two Dilemmas in Counseling: Mandated Treatment and Clery Reporting
Doing Bystander Intervention Well: Seven Easy Steps
Title IX and BITs
Counseling and Conduct: Working Together
Should I Write this Down? BIT Documentation Do’s and Don’ts

Fall 2013

Hamsters in the Hallways: Navigating the Law Regarding Animals on Campus
Readmission Requirements following a Psychological Crisis
Addressing Disruptive and Dangerous Student Behavior in the Classroom
Training Front Office Staff to Identify, Report and Manage Disruptive and Dangerous Behavior
Managing the Suicidal Student on Campus
Forensic Threat Assessment: Hire a Specialist or Train Existing Staff?
Seven Things We Can Do To End Hazing
Mandatory Reporters Under Title IX, Title VII & Clery

Recordings now available for purchase!  Click here.

Trainings were 90 minutes each prior to Fall 2016 and 60 minutes each post-Fall 2016. Price is $249.99 per recording for 2013 trainings and $349 per recording for 2014-current trainings. To pay via cheque, please download an order form here.

Questions? Click here to read The NCHERM Group Online Trainings FAQs

Hamsters in the Hallways: Navigating the Law Regarding Animals on Campus
Co-sponsored by The NCHERM Group and ATIXA
Click here.

Presenter: Saunie Schuster, J.D.

Training Description

  • A student approaches the ADA and requests to bring her cat into the residence halls to help with her anxiety and social phobias. She has documentation from a medication professional. How does your school approach this?
  • When animals are brought onto campus and into the classroom for this purpose, what is the protocol?
  • What does the law say about allowing these types of animals to assist students on campus?

Animals assist humans in many ways. Often, as in the case of Therapy, Companion and Service animals, they play an important role in facilitating the independence of people living with physical and mental difficulties and disabilities.  Today, there is some confusion about how to handle these animals and incoming requests from students. This webinar will offer some clarity as schools review their decision-making process. Join legal expert Saundra Schuster to discuss some of the recent controversy and conflict in the area of Service, Therapy and Companion animal requests. Schuster will review pertinent legal cases and will discuss the related administrative issues related to the student’s requests. Each will also offer some proactive suggestions and alternatives for students whose requests cannot be accommodated. Practical Takeaways

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will discuss the foundational definitions of Service, Companion and Therapy animals
  • Participants will review the common psychological and medical reasons for requests
  • Participants will discuss how recent court cases provide insight into current policy and discover alternatives to requests that are not allowed

Who Should Attend

  • Disability services staff
  • Legal counsel
  • Dean of Students
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential Life staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Readmission Requirements following a Psychological Crisis
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and W. Scott Lewis, J.D.

Training Description

There has been a great deal of discussion and confusion following the OCR change regarding medical leaves for students exhibiting suicidal or other psychological crisis behaviors. In cases where the student chooses to leave campus through a medical withdrawal (either voluntarily or involuntarily), schools struggle with the identifying return conditions for those students as they request to come back to campus. Join Brian Van Brunt and Scott Lewis to discuss the psychological, administrative and legal implications of these return to campus conditions. During our time together, we will review:

  • A brief summary of the OCR restrictions on forced medical leaves for suicidal and harm-to-self behavior
  • A discussion of the four part direct threat test requirements regarding forced medical leaves for students who pose a risk to others due to a medical or psychological condition
  • Exploration of conditional return policies and how they can be created in a manner that is psychologically and legally sound
  • Discussion of several case studies to help participants navigate the challenging waters of assisting students in their return to campus
  • A review of proper documentation, treatment planning, case management and community impact

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will explore how OCR changes impact our ability to create return to campus conditions for students following a medical leave
  • Participants will discuss ways to reduce the legal risk and work collaboratively with other departments to ensure solid policy and procedure development
  • Participants will review ways to best create a positive experience for the student while balancing the needs for community safety and while taking steps to reduce the risk of future incidents

Who Should Attend

  • Dean of Students
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Addressing Disruptive and Dangerous Student Behavior in the Classroom
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: W. Scott Lewis, J.D. & Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description:

  • A student sits in your classroom, distracted and not listening to the lecture. She talks to her friends in back of the classroom and it’s hard to focus on the lecture. When you talk to her about the behavior she acts entitled and rude.
  • A student yells at her professor over a grade she received. She yells, “If you don’t change this grade, I’ll make you wish you were dead.”
  • A student talks to himself during the lecture. He has a collection of odd action figures in his bag and is teased by other students in the class.
  • A student has open scabs on her arms. She often picks at them during class until they bleed. She keeps several bloody tissues in her lap. Other students are upset and disgusted by this.

One of the largest challenges facing higher education today is helping faculty differentiate and manage disruptive behavior in the classroom. This is a challenge for the faculty, as well as those who are in support roles for the faculty and those who accept referrals from faculty. This program will help participants understand the basics of classroom management, as well as how to address crisis behaviors and refer dangerous students to the appropriate staff. This practical seminar will draw from concepts in Van Brunt’s and Lewis’ new book A Faculty Guide to Addressing Disruptive and Dangerous Behavior, published by Taylor and Francis. Registrants will receive a 20% discount for the text if they are interested in purchasing it from Taylor and Francis.

Practical Takeaways

  • An exhaustive list of disruptive and dangerous behavioral examples for both online and traditional teaching environments
  • Research-based suggestions and intervention techniques to help faculty better assess, intervene and manage difficult behavior
  • Coverage of special populations, including non-traditional, veteran and Millennial students
  • Discussion of the latest laws and regulations that should affect and inform faculty’s decisions

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review the difference between disruptive and dangerous behaviors
  • Participants will explore how to intervene with disruptive students and how to de-escalate dangerous students behavior
  • Participants will be able to describe how to work with campus departments in order to create successful referrals

Who Should Attend

  • Faculty and department chairs
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Training Front Office Staff to Identify, Report and Manage Disruptive and Dangerous Behavior
Co-sponsored by The NCHERM Group and NaBITA
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

A student shows up at the front desk of your office… yelling, crying, upset, frustrated, tearful, angry, overwhelmed, pushy, aggravated, annoyed, demanding, obnoxious, smelly, drunk, disoriented… …what do you do? Front office staff are often placed in situations where they are nose-to-nose with students, faculty and staff who are not at their best. They are asked to create a warm, caring, customer-service focused space for students, faculty, and staff to have their questions answered. Problems occur from the Registrar to the Admissions office, from Residential Life to Advising, from Counseling to Testing. Students demand services from Parking and Transportation and often become frustrated with front-line service staff, such as cashiers in dining services and financial aid tellers. People become upset with Student Affairs office staff and Academic Affairs. This program will offer some practical advice on how to work with emotional and at-risk faculty, staff and students who approach front office staff in a disrespectful manner in person, on the phone or through email. The presenters will also discuss ways to create an office waiting room environment that will help reduce conflict and prevent problems before they start.

Practical Takeaways

  • A summary of how to deal with difficult people by keeping calm, cool and collected
  • A discussion of how to address phone and Internet communications and how to create a safe, warm and comfortable waiting room
  • A review of how to say no or redirect in a manner that doesn’t escalate
  • An understanding of how to leave with strategies to create an office environment that supports students, faculty and staff in crisis

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review common frustrations encountered by front office staff and how to use various techniques to de-escalate potential problems from becoming incidents of violence
  • Participants will discuss ways to utilize prevention techniques to get out ahead of potential conflicts in the office
  • Participants will review ways to refer at-risk students and develop relationship with key departments on campus to assist in the case of an emergency

Who Should Attend

  • Prevention educators
  • K-12 teachers
  • Faculty
  • Guidance counselors
  • Community prevention staff
  • Greek Life
  • Student Activities
  • Dean of Students
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members
  • Front office staff in any department (Counseling and Testing, Residential Life, Health Services, Admissions Office, Student Affairs Reception, Financial Aid, Registrar, Police Dispatch, Bookstore, Food Service, Library, Computing Services, Athletics, Fitness Center, President’s Office, Academic Affairs)

Click here to purchase.

Managing the Suicidal Student on Campus
Co-sponsored by SCOPE and NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt. Ed.D. and Josh Gunn, Ph.D.

Training Description

  • How can you manage a student who may present a danger to themselves or others on campus given the changes in the OCR standard?
  • What should a counseling center do in terms of session limits, triaging new cases and defining a scope of practice that may exclude higher-risk students?
  • How do we avoid turning the campus into an inpatient unit?
  • How do you balance the needs of the community versus the needs of the individual student?
  • In what ways are campuses using case management services to address these needs?

One of the most difficult situations to deal with on today’s college campus is managing the process of hospitalizing a student for psychiatric reasons.  Residential life staff is often concerned about the impact of suicide attempts on other students and their residential life community. Deans and Administrators are concerned about potential liability to the college and how they can receive the information they need to make key decisions involving the student remaining on campus, interim suspension, ADA regulations and parental notifications. Counselors are often concerned for the student’s welfare and returning them back to campus safely. Join Drs. Van Brunt and Gunn as they share their experiences and review national data related to managing suicidal students on campus. Dr. Gunn will also share his perspective as the current president of the American College Counseling Association. This program will discuss the key elements of the process involved when a student attempts suicide, how the student should be evaluated and transported to the hospital, how information is shared with parents, the pros and cons of interim suspension versus a medical leave of absence, and how to keep both the student and the greater community safe. The program will be designed around seven key areas related to suicide attempts, hospitalization and the methods by which a student is then removed from campus or returns to the community.

These areas will include:

  1. The Initial Crisis: Here our presenters will discuss what student behaviors lead to an admission into a psychiatric facility. This will include discussion of lethality and communication between police, health services, Dean and VP of student affairs, counseling and residential life.
  2. Admission: Here we will review how a student is hospitalized, the importance of having a MOU with the local admitting facilities, what paperwork should be completed, release of information signed, how the ER pre-screening process works, and differences between involuntary and voluntary commitment.
  3. Communication: Here the discussion will center on communication between the school and the student, how/when/who will talk with parents or support people for the student, how FERPA and HIPAA apply, emergency sharing of counseling notes and testing with hospital, setting up pathways for treatment planning and case management.
  4. Circle of Impact: Here we will discuss how to respond to the community that may have been impacted with by the suicide attempt. How to address roommate and community concerns, faculty and staff opinions, parent’s requests and programming options to the residence hall. We will also stress the impact of working directly with upset, tired and frustrated staff who have been involved in the incident to prevent burnout and compassion fatigue.
  5. The Return: Here we will discuss the process of return to campus versus the separation from campus. Again we will review information gathering and sharing, ADA regulations, conduct process versus a more informal process and community impact.
  6. Watchful Eye:  Here we will review some best practices to work with the students through mandated assessment and counseling, psychoeducational groups, communication with parents and monitoring community behavior and conduct.
  7. After the Storm:  Here we will stress the importance of case management and follow-up after the initial suicide attempt in order to prevent future attempts. Focus on how to provide services and/or referrals to students to keep them safe in the future during the two-week high-risk period following discharge.

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review the initial crisis, management and aftercare for suicidal students on campus
  • Participants will discuss the data related to suicide attempts and the management of suicidal students on campus following an attempt
  • Participants will review collaborative communication with various departments and off-campus providers as well as understanding how counseling centers work with at-risk students

Who Should Attend

  • Student Activities
  • Dean of Students
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Forensic Threat Assessment: Hire a Specialist or Train Existing Staff?
Co-sponsored by The NCHERM Group and NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

This program will provide offer a practical and detailed exploration of what characteristics and qualities a college or university should look for when looking to hire (or internally train and develop) the capacity to perform forensic risk assessments. These assessments are used to determine if a student presents a risk to harm others at the university and often are the starting place to determine if a student is safe to return to campus following a direct communicated threat or action that may place the community at risk. The speakers will review the following content:

  • What are the pros and cons of hiring an off-campus professional versus training an on-campus counseling center staff member to do these assessments?
  • What are the professional requirements, licensure issues, training needs and expertise needed to complete this work?
  • What special conditions (cost, timeliness, report detail, included tests) should be reviewed prior to developing these assessments
  • What are the legal risks of contracting with a forensic professional and following the report results?
  • How do threat assessment evaluations differ from psychological evaluations and suicide evaluations?

This program will answer these questions and provide practical advice for college and universities to consider when developing the capacity for this kind of assessment.

Practical Takeaways

  • A summary of the pros and cons of conducting these assessments on and off campus
  • A list of 20 questions useful to ask any off-campus evaluator before contracting
  • A list of Do’s and Don’ts related to hiring off campus providers or training on campus staff to complete these assessments
  • Sample case studies, assessment letters and discussion materials to continue the learning beyond the online training

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will have the opportunity to explore the various issues related to locating and contracting an off-campus forensic threat assessment professional
  • Participants will review what kind of threats should be referred for a full threat assessment and what risk factors should be considered in the evaluation.
  • Participants will have the opportunity to review differences between four-year and community colleges, residential and commuter campuses, and rural versus urban settings.

Who Should Attend

  • Guidance Counselors
  • Student Activities
  • Dean of Students
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Seven Things We Can Do To End Hazing
Sponsored by SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter: Gentry McCreary, Ph.D.

Training Description

  • A group of students pressures the incoming pledges of a sorority to engage in dangerous acts
  • A group of students living on a residence hall floor target a student who wants to join the “in group” and make him complete a series of embarrassing tasks
  • New athletes on a university team are required to participate in a series of humiliating activities at the first team party

Hazing is a problem that needs to be addressed at both public and private college and universities. The problem can be seen within fraternity, sorority and athletic organizations, as well as other clubs, intramural sports teams, honor societies and residence halls. This program brings practical advice to better understand the factors that lead to hazing on campus, as well as offers important insights into prevention.

Seven Things We Can Do To End Hazing Will Include

  • Discussion of factors that cause individuals and groups to haze
  • Review of how hazing differs from bullying and teasing
  • Understanding factors related to creating a culture that supports hazing
  • Exploration of masculinity as it relates to hazing
  • Importance of obtaining stakeholder buy-in when addressing hazing behavior
  • Key factors to prevent hazing by outlining the core concepts to teaching hazing prevention well
  • Building resiliency for those at-risk for being hazed and connecting to additional national resources

Practical Takeaways

  • Clear evidence-based approaches to addressing hazing on campus
  • Identification of “hot spots” for hazing on campus
  • List of national resources and useful, practical approaches to addressing hazing on your campus

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will explore the concept of hazing and what factors increase a community’s risk
  • Participants will discuss ways to reduce the risk of hazing within groups, as well as increasing the resiliency of those who may be the victim of hazing
  • Participants will review ways to best teach a community to reduce the risk of hazing violence

Who Should Attend

  • Prevention educators
  • K-12 teachers
  • Faculty
  • Guidance counselors
  • Community prevention staff
  • Greek Life
  • Student Activities
  • Dean of Students
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Mandatory Reporters Under Title IX, Title VII & Clery
Co-sponsored by The NCHERM Group, ATIXA & SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter: Saunie Schuster, J.D.

Training Description

This 90-minute webstream training is designed to inform participants about institutional and individual duties to report sexual abuse, sexual misconduct and other behaviors that fall under Title IX. Expert Presenter, Saunie Schuster, will comprehensively cover the varying and often overlapping reporting expectations of Title IX, Title VII and Clery pertaining to:

  • Sex and gender discrimination incidents, including
  • Sexual harassment
  • Sexual assault
  • Bullying
  • Stalking and
  • Other related behaviors
  • Crimes and crime statistics for Clery Act compliance, when those crimes intersect with Title IX and Title VII (as in the case of sexual assault).

Mandatory Reporters Under Title IX, Title VII & Clery will include

  • Basics of Title IX protections
  • Basics of Title VII protections
  • Basics of Clery Act/Campus SaVE reporting
  • The role of the Title IX Coordinator
  • Distinguishing sex/gender discrimination from crimes
  • What supervisors need to report
  • What supervisees need to report
  • Expectations for faculty
  • Expectations for RAs and Residence Life staff
  • What to do if you are unsure of what to report, when, how or to whom
  • The full report v. the Jane/John Doe report — how do you know which one to file?
  • Confidential employees and the duty to report
  • What to do with victim requests for confidentiality
  • Addressing duties to report abuse of minors
  • Off-campus conduct and the duty to report
  • Conduct by guests, visitors and subcontractors

This training will then present a model approach to mandated reporting that, if followed, will help eliminate the confusion, endless debates, disagreements, headaches and gray areas so pervasive in this area.

Learning Objectives

  • Articulate the varying mandatory reporter standards for Title IX, Title VII, Clery in relation to sex and gender discrimination in the higher education setting
  • Understand the differences between confidential and non-confidential reporters at colleges and universities
  • Understand how to address situations involving minors on-campus
  • Explain a straightforward solution to the mandated reporter confusion

Who Should Attend

  • Dean of Students staff
  • Legal Counsel
  • Student conduct officers
  • Faculty
  • Administrators
  • Title IX Administrators
  • Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Health service staff
  • Residential Life staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here to purchase.

Post-vention and Suicide Response
Co-sponsored by NaBITA and SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter: David J. Denino, LPC, NCC

Training Description

Join expert David Denino as he walks participants through the challenges facing institutions regarding the response to suicide on campus. Drawing from his experience as counseling center director, QPR Master Trainer, and experience with the Red Cross and responding to multiple disasters across the country in the past decade, David will help institutions understand:

  • The basics to post-vention activities
  • The need for planning post-vention activities and having plans in place prior to a crisis
  • The importance of post-vention plans being applied equally to all losses
  • Gain knowledge as to how to deal with grief or loss
  • Be familiar about working with groups affected by mass casualty and loss of life
  • Apply concise, real life experiences to the post-vention response: single media contacts, working with faculty when addressing students in class after a crisis event,  reviewing of incident command structure and working with off-campus partners
  • How to identify and respond to the various community members involved in an incident on campus

This program will be informative and will encourage specific questions related to the suicide response from a multitude of perspectives. Participants will receive a detailed summary based on the PowerPoint presentation, a list of do’s and don’ts when it comes to suicide post-vention response, questions and online resources, and example case scenarios to assist participants in continuing the discussion beyond the online training event.

Click here to purchase.

Fighting Mid-Semester Burnout and Stress
Co-sponsored by The NCHERM Group, NaBITA, ATIXA and SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Campus shootings, retention efforts, end-of-year reports, caseload quota, the drive for positive customer services — sometimes, it can all be too much. When these situations pile up and the office attitude takes a turn for the worse, what are staff and faculty to do? How do you approach the “stress problem” before it impacts productivity and morale? Join Brian Van Brunt as he talks to your faculty and staff about ways to manage stress and prevent mid-semester burnout. Some signs that your staff and faculty might be experiencing burnout:

  • Many continue to call in sick and display a ‘less than motivated’ attitude.
  • Department productivity drops and any mention of new projects or ‘working harder’ is met with groans and frustrations.
  • Your depressing department morale would shock most visitors, even Eeyore. It is filled with negative energy, sarcasm, and cynicism.
  • It used to be a great place to work, but the staff is so overwhelmed with the workload that no one is happy or energized.

Sound familiar? This program will provide clear, research-based advice to better address feelings of stress, burnout, negative energy, and general feelings of exhaustion that impact an office, department, or group of faculty. The presenter will draw from positive psychology, flow theory, and research on the effects of stress and burnout to help staff and faculty find a new love for their work and come away recharged.

Participants will

  • Develop an understanding of the signs and symptoms of stress and burnout and learn ways to better cope and manage these problems.
  • Understand the components of positive psychology and learn to apply these to their daily work.
  • Review how supervisors can address staff burnout and stress reactions as they happen.
  • Learn to use flow theory and develop a better tolerance for failure (or delayed success) in their daily workload.
  • Review several motivational approaches to reinvigorating employees and returning them to a more optimistic view of work.
  • Learn crisis management and ways to deal with critical reactions as they manifest (e.g. blowing up in staff meetings, yelling at students, slamming doors, hitting desks).
  • Be given several preventative strategies to address staff burnout before it happens (through support, setting appropriate boundaries, use of downtime, empathy training, cycle breathing).

Who Should Attend

  • Two-year institutions & Four-year institutions
  • Vice President Academic Affairs/Instruction
  • Dean of Instruction
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full-time and part-time)
  • Human Resources

Click here to purchase.

The Role of Mental Health Professionals on the BIT
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

 Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

With the increase of direct communicated threats, suicidal students and at-risk behaviors across college and university campuses, the creation of Threat Assessment Team (TAT) and Behavioral Intervention Teams (BIT) has also risen to address these concerns. Counselors and psychologists have been left to sort through their involvement on these teams. On one hand, we know that close to two-thirds of cases discussed by teams have mental health and substance abuse involvement (NaBITA survey, 2012). On the other hand, clinical staff struggle with the ethical limits to information sharing and identifying the best ways to communicate and participate on these teams. Join Brian Van Brunt, president-elect of the National Behavioral Intervention Team Association (NaBITA), as he offers advice and guidance on how clinical staff can uphold their ethical guidelines while offering consultation and much needed assistance to those involved in keeping a campus safe.

Participants will review:

  • Limitations on clinical staff related to information sharing
  • How FERPA, HIPAA and state confidentiality laws interact with each other
  • Ways to work with the team while maintaining professional standards
  • How to find common ground in the conflict that can occur between clinical staff and administrators
  • Special considerations for community and technology colleges

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts when it comes to clinical staff on the BIT, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSA and Deans
  • Academic affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Air Traffic Control for Helicopter Parents
Sponsored  by NaBITA
Click here.

 Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and Carolyn Reinach Wolf, J.D.

Training Description

Parents worry. Some are concerned about their children’s relationships, academic standing, or living arrangements. And some parents bring their concerns to bear when speaking with faculty members – sometimes at the top of their lungs. So what should you do? Brian Van Brunt and Carolyn Wolf suggest that you see this type of situation as a “teachable moment” for the parent.

  • Learn about the costs associated with taking a “hard line” approach with overprotective and aggressive parents in efforts to shift them away from these behaviors.
  • Learn practical skills and theories and review case examples of how parents engage in pushy, needy and aggressive behavior.
  • Learn the art of referral and redirection as a way to manage aggressive and overly involved parents.

Student affairs personnel are trained to answer questions and help solve problems, whether dealing with students or their parents. But what if the problem is the parent? As advocates for their college-aged students, some parents resort to pushy, demanding or downright aggressive behavior. These so-called “helicopter parents” can be the stuff of legend around the water cooler, but they also take a toll on morale and productivity.

Objectives and Resources

  • What drives these particular parents to act this way
  • How parents may have been rewarded for aggressive behavior in the past
  • Why a hardline response doesn’t work
  • A practical list of do’s and don’ts when working with parents who are frustrated and aggressive
  • An introduction to motivational interviewing, rationale emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), and the art of persuasion, from aggression management
  • A primer in the techniques of referral and redirection–effective ways to respond to insistent, over-involved parents
  • A list of ten best practice concepts, including a sample staff policy statement
  • A guide for addressing the top 20 parent concerns, suitable to use for training. Each example uses natural language, and offers suggestions of alternative explanations and answers to parents’ questions and demands.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises.

Who Should Attend

  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Hosting Minors on Campus: What You Need to Know
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

Presenters:  Saundra Schuster, J.D. and Katie Clifford, J.D.

Training Description

College isn’t just for those eighteen and above anymore! Minors come on campus for a variety of reasons during the course of the year. Some schools have educational programs that teach students under eighteen. Others host minors at facilities on campus for training, education and social events. Given the recent cases involving minor abuse on campus, it is essential to review your institution’s policy and procedures that guide action when minors come to campus. Attorneys Schuster and Clifford have the experience and practical knowledge to help you mitigate the potential risk when minors are on campus. Join them as they explore heightened risk issues of mandated reporting, parental notification, single day events and the special considerations when minors stay overnight. As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Ten Practical Ways to Reduce Liability for Suicidal Students on Campus
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters:  Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D. and  Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Join Daniel Swinton and Brian Van Brunt as they tackle one of the most challenging issues facing college administrators today: How to manage and mitigate the risk for students who attempt suicide. Bringing with them decades of experience in higher education, student affairs administration, legal practice and counseling expertise, Swinton and Van Brunt will:

  • Help schools understand how to work with suicidal students without running afoul of OCR regulations
  • Review treatment and care guidelines to reduce suicide risk on campus
  • Explore how to address community impact of students who attempt suicide in a public manner that disturbs the campus community
  • Review special considerations for non-residential campuses
  • Ensure proper adherence to readmission standards with a stress on working with the student, their family and treatment provider

The presenters will address the following ten ways to reduce liability

  1. Following OCR standards and working within ADA
  2. Involving parents and other care-givers
  3. Establishment of suicide gatekeeper programs on campus to proactively address risk
  4. Attending to the crisis event leading to admission
  5. Working with off-campus treatment providers through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
  6. Adopting a case management model that builds from a social work perspective
  7. Advocating with academic advisors and professors around courses
  8. Avoiding a “one size fits all” screening process when a student is returned to campus
  9. Attending to the campus community those impacted by a suicide attempt
  10. Addressing student behavior through a student of concern team based manner

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Addressing Two Dilemmas in Counseling: Mandated Treatment and Clery Reporting
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Daniel C. Swinton. J.D., Ed.D. and Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Two topics for the price of one! Join Brian Van Brunt and Daniel Swinton as they address two central dilemmas facing many counseling centers today. During the first half of the program, they will discuss the challenges of offering mandated treatment as part of the scope of treatment given the rise in counseling requests, difficulty providing enough services to a higher risk population, pressure to provide increased outreach and dwindling resources. Brian Van Brunt and Daniel Swinton will address the central question, “If a center offers mandated treatment, how can this be done ethically and within the larger context of service delivery?” In the second half of the program, the presenters will address the separate issue of Clery reporting. Some counseling centers view their staff as exempt from reporting requirements.  Others see anonymous, aggregate data reporting as a reasonable middle ground. Van Brunt and Swinton will share their perspectives from the legal, psychological and administrative perspectives.

Participants will review: 

  • How mandated treatment can be used to manage at-risk students on campus
  • The pros and cons for counseling centers struggling with mandated treatment
  • What are the legal requirements for Clery reporting for counseling staff on campus
  • How administration and clinicians can work together to sort through these challenges issues and find a common ground to work from

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Doing Bystander Intervention Well: Seven Easy Steps
Sponsored by SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter:  Jane Stapleton, M.A.

Training Description

You don’t have to look far in the realm of higher education to hear the catch phrase “bystander intervention.” This popular term is coming to mean a number of different things to a diverse group of professionals. This online seminar will review the basic tenants of bystander intervention while offering specific and practical advice to assist institutions in moving forward to reduce problematic behavior on campus and within the community. At its widest possible definition, bystander intervention engages all community members in creating communities where everyone has a role to play in stopping problem behaviors.  Bystander intervention teaches people to intervene before, during and after health and safety issues and is essentially about engaging community members to create communities and social norms where abuse of any kind is not acceptable. This approach has been applied to:

  • Reducing sexual violence against women
  • Addressing bullying behavior
  • Encouraging discussion on racist, bigoted and hate-filled language
  • Speaking to alcohol and drug excess within the community
  • Tackling the issues of hazing on campus

This program will review the basic concepts of bystander intervention while highlighting several successful programs dedicated to using violence prevention concepts to address problematic behavior on campus. Practical case examples and advice will be shared so that you can apply these techniques on your campus. Further research and resources will be described. As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion. Participants will:

  • Learn how and why bystander intervention is preferable to simply addressing victim safety strategies
  • Review several bystander intervention programs offered by consultants and third-party companies
  • Discuss ways to apply bystander intervention strategies on their campus
  • Learn from practical case examples and advice on applying techniques in specific situations on campus

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Title IX and BITs
Co-sponsored by ATIXA and NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters:  Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D. and Saundra Schuster, J.D.

Training Description

  • What should Behavioral Intervention Teams (BITs) know about Title IX?
  • Should the Title IX coordinator or investigator be part of the campus BIT?
  • What reporting requirements exist for campus threat teams?
  • How does the training and educational mission of the BIT overlap with Title IX?
  • What are the legal “hot spots” schools should have on their radar?

Staff and faculty who serve on the BIT have reporting requirements and a responsibility not only to be in compliance with Title IX; they also have a responsibility to serve in an educational capacity as they share reporting requirements and manage at-risk behavior for the larger campus as a whole. Daniel Swinton and Saundra Schuster will bring their administrative experience and legal expertise to focus on this essential training issue for campus BITs. They will provide guidance and practical advice when it comes to reporting requirements, documentation expectations and how the BIT should communicate with the campus Title IX coordinator. Join us for this important event! As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • Title IX coordinators and investigators
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Counseling and Conduct: Working Together
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters:  Jason Ebbeling, J.D. and Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

They are two of the most essential departments on your campus: Counseling and Conduct. There are times, however, when these two departments don’t work together as well as one would like. Counseling staff feel limited to share information because of their state confidentiality requirements. Conduct staff become frustrated when counseling isn’t a team player. Counseling staff don’t want to be seen as a punishing arm of the university. Student conduct becomes frustrated at the caricature of their work being ‘punishment’ based rather than focused on developmental education and restorative justice. How can these two departments work more efficiently with each other? Join Jason Ebbeling, VPSA at Mitchell College, and Brian Van Brunt, with his experience directing two counseling centers, as they wrestle with these problems and offer practical advice such as:

  • Understanding each other’s worldview through cross training and conference attendance
  • Getting out ahead of the problem before the crisis occurs
  • Setting expectations early and focusing on how to process those times when things aren’t going well
  • Using tabletop scenarios and position-switching to increase understanding between departments
  • Adopting a solution-focused approach to moving forward
  • Avoiding problematic inflammatory language like “that’s confidential” and “you aren’t a team player”

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Should I Write this Down? BIT Documentation Do’s and Don’ts
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Saundra Schuster, J.D. and Brett Sokolow, J.D.

Training Description

There are numerous questions when BIT members are faced with the concept of documentation:

  • How much should I write down? How much is too much?
  • What are the legal requirements for BIT record keeping?
  • Who has access to the information on the BIT?
  • Are computer records secure?
  • What are the benefits over paper files?
  • How much do we have to share if there is a request by an administrator at the college in order to assist their decision-making?
  • What are students entitled to see?
  • Are faculty and staff records kept differently?
  • How long are these records kept? Can records be expunged?
  • How are counseling, conduct and case management records different?

Join Attorneys Schuster and Sokolow as they answer all of these questions and more. This program will outline the practical and proactive steps BITs and TATs should take in order to get out in front of problems related to documentation. Our presenters will draw on their front-line legal experience while providing guidance from a their experience on BITs. As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event to make the content available to staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary of PowerPoint, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring and academic advising
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Policing the Drunken Campus Hook-Up:  Law, Policy and Best Practices
Co-sponsored by The NCHERM Group & ATIXA
Click here.

Presenters: Brett Sokolow, J.D. and Rick Olshak, M.S.

Training Description

At a time when the pressure is on campuses to get tough on sexual violence, Brett Sokolow says it’s more important to get it right than to get tough.   Campuses are feeling the heat in the form of the first report of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, which encouraged men to respect women with a public service announcement featuring Benicio Del Toro, Dulé Hill, Steve Carrell, Daniel Craig, Seth Meyers, Vice President Biden and President Obama.  The Office for Civil Rights released 53 more pages on how to comply with Title IX, but Sokolow thinks many campuses could do better on how to deal with drunken hook-ups between students. Join us on this online training as Brett Sokolow and co-presenter Rick Olshak explore the intricacies of sexual assault policy as applied to intoxication and incapacitation, the challenges of helping hearing panels to know what crosses the line, and the potential for gender bias and discrimination that come from bad decisions. During this 90-minute training, Sokolow and Olshak will review:

  • Making the policy distinction between intoxication and incapacitation;
  • Understanding the need for a “knew or should have known standard” to avoid a gender-biased disciplinary outcome;
  • Understanding the blackout and how it impacts on incapacity;
  • What are the signs of incapacitation?
  • How do you train panels and investigators how to sort this out when both parties are drinking?

Once the formal presentation is offered, Sokolow and Olshak will each present three short case studies involving students, alcohol and sex.  Sokolow will offer the first three to Olshak, a career student conduct administrator.   The presenters will discuss each case and their views on how it should best be handled.  The audience will then weigh in with questions and comments.  Then, Olshak will offer his three cases to Sokolow, and the two will discuss, again with input from the audience. We expect a lively debate, and strong learning outcomes that move campuses toward best practices on this challenging issue. As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend

  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Title IX Investigators
  • Vice Presidents of Student Affairs
  • Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Campus Police
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Prevention educators
  • Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Office staff
  • Advocacy center staff
  • Health center staff

Click here.

 International Student Arrival: Preparing Your Campus’s Faculty and Staff
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and Kelly Almousily

Training Description

International students are often at higher risk for adjustment difficulties and acclimation challenges that come with living and learning in a new culture and country. These adjustments often include language barriers, knowledge of a new city and country, connecting with peers and the stressors of their academic programs. Join Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Kelly Almousily as they bring together their knowledge and experience offering programming, counseling and support to those international students going through the transition of arriving on campus. In this program, participants will learn:

  • Common sources of stress and difficulties for international students on campus
  • How existing departments can augment their services and outreach to better welcome and accommodate international students
  • Key “hot-spots” to be aware of with supporting international students
  • Clear and practical advice on how to assist international students overcoming hurdles

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • International Student and Scholar Services staff
  • Academic Advisors
  • Vice Presidents of Student Affairs
  • Deans of Students
  • Student conduct officers
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Counseling and Health staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Update on Title IX and Compliance
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

Presenters: W. Scott Lewis, J.D.

Training Description

  • What observations or behaviors should staff and faculty report to the Title IX Coordinator?
  • What are the reporting requirements for a college or university that does not have clear Title IX staff identified?
  • What reporting requirements exist for campus threat teams?
  • How does the training and educational mission of the college overlap with Title IX requirements?
  • What are the legal “hot spots” schools should have on their radar?
  • What guidance do current case law and existing Title IX complaints offer to schools trying to remain in compliance?

Scott Lewis will bring his administrative experience and legal expertise to focus on these essential training issues for campus faculty and staff. He will provide guidance and practical advice when it comes to reporting requirements, documentation expectations and how faculty and staff should communicate with the campus Title IX Coordinator. Join us for this important event! As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • Title IX Coordinators and Investigators
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring staff
  • Academic advising staff
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Separating Dangerousness from Anger: Assessing True Threat
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

One of the most pressing challenges in the field of threat assessment is determining the difference between feeling threatened by a situation versus actually being threatened. While some of this is a question of semantics, there are certain legal and student conduct ramifications in terms of intervention, education, training and follow-up that should be understood. Another challenge for teams is parsing the difference between an actual threat and a disquieting or upsetting situation. This concept is explored in Calhoun and Weston’s (2009) concept of “Hunters and Howlers.” They explain that hunters hunt and howlers howl. They argue that there is a difference between acting and talking. Behavioral intervention and threat assessment professionals are faced with the challenge of addressing threats, but also of attending to the more silent, predatory behaviors that may elude student conduct and law enforcement violence. In this program, participants will explore:

  • Differences between feeling threatened and being threatened
  • The legal and student conduct implications surrounding feeling threatened and direct threat
  • How to develop a process to intervene for BIT in both cases
  • A review of Calhoun and Weston’s concepts of hunters and howlers
  • Discussion of risk factors related to violence

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • BIT members
  • Threat assessment professionals
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full- and part-time)
  • Advising staff
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Communications staff

Click here.

Issues of Gender Violence in LGBT Communities
Co-sponsored by ATIXA and SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter: Michelle Issadore, M.Ed.

Training Description

It has never been more important to ensure that your campus policies, procedures and prevention efforts are inclusive. With the passage and implementation of the Campus SaVE Act, as well as Title IX guidance, compliance questions are at an all-time high. Learn how to best serve all members of your campus community.

  • What is some model language with which to discuss LGBT gender violence?
  • What are the myths versus the facts on LGBT gender violence?
  • What does the research tell us in terms of statistics on this issue?
  • Why are reporting rates so low for member of LGBT communities?
  • How can support services better accommodate the needs of LGBT victims?
  • What are the best practice recommendations for being inclusive toward LGBT victims?
  • What are the common mistakes practitioners make when serving LGBT victims?
  • What are the special considerations for assisting LGBT victims?
  • How can outreach be better geared toward the LGBT population?
  • What are some tips for working with LGBT respondents?
  • What are the foundational resources to learn more on this topic?

Join Michelle Issadore as she answers all of these questions and more. This program will outline the practical and proactive steps campus staff can take to better understand, as well as prevent and respond to, gender violence in LGBT communities. Our presenter will draw on her years of advocate and trainer experience while providing guidance. As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring staff
  • Academic advising staff
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members
  • Prevention educators
  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Title IX Investigators
  • Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Office staff
  • Advocacy center staff
  • Health center staff

Click here.

Responding to a Student Death
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and Rev. Markus von Steinfort 

Training Description

It’s the last thing any campus administrator, counselor or psychologist wants to think about: the death of a student. Whether related to physical or mental health challenges, poor decision-making or unexplained circumstances, the loss of any life is tragic and difficult for which to prepare. As seen on several college campuses, when the life of a student is snuffed out prematurely, it can be devastating. Any responsible campus crisis plan must include provisions for dealing with student death. Regardless of the circumstances, the way in which a campus responds can make all the difference to both the immediate family and the greater campus community that suddenly finds itself in mourning. Inevitably, community and individual reactions will be varied and will elicit a wide range of responses. How will you deal with public reaction? How will you address questions from students and support them through their grief process? How will you respect and offer both support and information to the affected families? How will you respond to media inquiries and national press coverage? Every institution must be fully prepared to deal with a variety of possible tragedies, scenarios and proactive responses. This online training will offer an overview of grief theory, as well as plans for how administrators can respond to student death on campus. Participants will review the stages of grief, consider extremely sensitive situations such as suicide and devise concrete plans for dealing with the aftermath of such a tragedy.

  • Review the stages of grief
  • Understand the importance of “helping the helpers”
  • Learn about special considerations when coping with suicide
  • Review scenarios that involve complicated grief responses
  • Devise plans for outreach to faculty and the classroom
  • Discuss the importance of hosting memorials
  • Review student death checklists
  • Provide grief handouts and trauma information

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs/Instruction
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full and part-time)
  • Advising staff
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Communications staff

Click here.

Managing Faculty and Staff Expectations Following a BIT Intervention
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters:  Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.W. Scott Lewis, J.D. and Brett Sokolow, J.D.

Training Description

  • “It’s either me or this student! One of us won’t be in class next week.”
  • “I don’t understand why they are back in my class again. They just threatened someone last week.”
  • “I never hear back on any of the reports I make to your team. Why should I keep reporting?”

One of the most pressing challenges for a Behavioral Intervention Team is managing the expectations faculty and staff bring to the table following their initial report of concern. BITs spend a good deal of time marketing to the community the importance of reporting concerns. Once faculty and staff report these concerns, there is often an expectation of action and follow up. How does the BIT respond when they cannot act in a way that the faculty or staff expect? The problem arises when the BIT’s actions don’t line up with faculty or staff expectations. This program will draw on the administrative, legal and psychological expertise of Lewis, Sokolow and Van Brunt to help better identify ways to manage faculty and staff expectations around response and how to minimize conflict. They will discuss the challenges and best practices inherent in the competing welfare of frightened employees and the protection of student rights. In this program, participants will explore:

  • How to successfully market the BIT to encourage reporting
  • The importance of on-going communication with the referral source around intervention and follow-up
  • Educating the referral source on the NaBITA tool and analytic process used in decision making
  • How to handle conflict when it arises between the BIT and the referral source

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • BIT members
  • Threat assessment professionals
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full and part-time)
  • Advising staff
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Communications staff

Click here.  

Addressing Title IX Matters in an Online Environment
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

Presenters: Joseph Allen, M.A. and Christina Jaquez, J.D.

Training Description

With many campuses now offering online and extended learning opportunities, there is a need to understand how best to address those matters involving the non-traditional student.  Come learn how Ashford University operationalizes its catalog policies surrounding online student Title IX matters and addresses student behavior through the use of technology, department partnerships and document tracking.

Learning Objectives
During this program, participants will review:

  • Catalog Language /policy summary
  • Departments involved (Title IX Coordinator, Office of Student Grievance Resolution, Student Conduct, Provost, Behavior Intervention Team)
  • Flow Chart review – Department ownership, shared visibility and accountability, timelines
  • Documentation, communication and tracking.
  • Remedies for supporting victim and opportunities for appropriate sanctioning of accused.
  •  Tools and tips for mitigating and re-directing inbound communications from on-line remote individuals.
  • Human Resources/Employee Relations support and resources for employees, faculty and staff associated with inappropriate behavior.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • Title IX Coordinators and Investigators
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring staff
  • Academic advising staff
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Generational Diversity: Managing Across Generations
Click here.

Presenter: Patty Pistoresi, M.A., MBA

Training Description

We’ve all heard the story of Generation: Me; how students these days approach the world as unique, special snowflakes; the challenges found in understanding, motivating, supervising and managing millennials in the workplace. What about Baby Boomers and how they approach work? How do Generation X’ers fit into the picture?

Join Patty Pistoresi as she brings her expertise in generational diversity to address the challenges faced in having four generations employed side by side in the workplace. She will present the background of each generation, how it developed its own generational personality, and then move to a practical and solution-focused discussion on how to motivate and work with each generation effectively.

Participants will learn:

  • Practical ways to address time management and reduce potential conflict
  • How to foster a positive working relationship between the generations
  • The role of listening and offering structure and clear messaging
  • “Hot spots” to avoid when it comes to supervision and setting expectations
  • How to set boundaries, enforce limits and get compliance

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full and part-time)
  • Advising staff
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Communications staff

Click here.

 

Getting Them Here, Keeping Them Here: Best Practices in Retaining Students to Graduation
Click here.
 

Presenter:  Aaron W. Hughey, Ed.D.

“Student retention is a vitally important topic for recruiters and education administrators alike. The business case for improving retention and completion rates is clear. However, an institution or a school’s effectiveness in managing retention is also increasingly seen as an important indicator of quality and commitment to student success.” (ICEF Monitor, 2014)

“As many as one in three first-year students don’t make it back for sophomore year. The reasons run the gamut from family problems and loneliness to academic struggles and a lack of money. If schools you’re considering have a low freshman retention rate, you’ll want to ask the admissions office why. Some colleges do a great job of taking care of their freshmen; some don’t.” (U.S. News & World Report, 2014)

Join your colleagues from across the country as we explore best practices in promoting college completion and learn strategies that you can adapt to your own campus. This will be an interactive webinar where you will learn current, evidence-based best practices associated with enhancing college student persistence to graduation. We’ll explore successful programs and initiatives in student persistence to graduation, as well as concrete recommendations as to how these services and activities can be successfully implemented in a variety of higher education environments. Equal emphasis will be placed on helping institutions, as well as individual students, achieve their mutual objective: graduation.

Participants will learn:

  • Why graduation is increasingly important for the student, the institution and society at large
  • The various factors that contribute to student persistence to graduation (including academic preparation, social integration, institutional support and financial considerations)
  • What can be done prior to students’ arrival on campus that will increase their probability of persistence to graduation, and how that should complement and reinforce what is done once they are on campus
  • How to identify potentially ‘at-risk’ students and how to effectively intervene with these students in an integrated and effective manner
  • Strategies that work – and those that don’t – with specific student populations
  • Methods that develop and foster institutional support for persistence initiatives, including how to enhance faculty support and participation in persistence to graduation initiatives
  • Ways to include parents in supporting their students towards a college degree and why this is especially critical to the current generation of college students
  • How to develop a comprehensive retention plan that puts everyone at the institution on the same page with respect to their retention efforts

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • Retention and recruitment staff
  • BIT members
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full and part-time)
  • Advising staff
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Communications staff

Click here.

Complying with the Campus SaVE Act Through Ongoing Educational Campaigns: Prevention Through Positive Media Messages
Co-sponsored by ATIXA and SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter:  Michelle Issadore, M.Ed. 

Training Description

The Campus SaVE Act requires that all campuses engage students and employees in ongoing educational campaigns related to sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, stalking and bystander intervention. This event will focus on how social norms and marketing campaigns can serve as prevention strategies. Methods for the creation, implementation and evaluation of campaigns will be explored and participants will be encouraged to consider ways to change community culture and norms through positive media messages.

  • What are some of the existing media campaigns on sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, and stalking?
  • How do you tailor a prevention message to an institutional culture?
  • How do you reach different styles of learners through educational campaigns?
  • How do you ensure that media images are inclusive of diverse persons and relationships?
  • What are some strategies for building upon educational campaigns, in terms of related programming and materials?
  • Who are some target audiences for media messages?

Join Michelle Issadore as she answers all of these questions and more. This program will highlight best practice recommendations, as well as offer insight into how to provide curricular infusion and strategically plan for your educational campaigns. Our presenter will draw on her years of practitioner and instructor experience while providing guidance.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend?

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members
  • Prevention educators
  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Title IX Investigators
  • Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Office staff
  • Advocacy center staff
  • Health center staff

Click here.

 

Update on the NaBITA Tool: What’s New?
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and Brett Sokolow, J.D.

Training Description

In April 2014, a new version of the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool was released after months of research and collaboration among senior NaBITA administrators and academics. The result is a tool that has a deeper set of academic citations, as well as additional clarity on key concepts such as decompensation, violence and hostility, baseline trajectory and conflict.

Join Sokolow and Van Brunt as they have a detailed and exciting conversation about the changes in the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool and what these changes mean for Behavioral Intervention Teams across the nation.
Participants will review:

  • Glasl’s Nine-Stage Model of Conflict Escalation
  • Key research related to threat assessment and behavioral intervention
  • How to understand baseline and trajectory
  • Using the Tool with SIVRA-35
  • How to address interventions following the rating of risk

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend?

  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members
  • Academic Advisors
  • VPSAs and Deans
  • Student conduct officers
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Counseling and Health staff

Click here.

BIT and Case Management Notes: 101
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Too hot? Too Cold? Just right!

This program offers clear, practical examples of what a case note should look like for BIT and case managers.

What makes a good note for BIT and case management? This topic has been tackled in the past as it applies to record management and general best practices, but often leaves the question remaining: what does a good note look like a BIT record and for case managers?

Based on his decades of clinical experience, Dr. Van Brunt will guide participants through examples of common mistakes BIT members and case managers make in documentation. These will include:

  • Taking too long to write the note and forgetting important details
  • Not including enough information in the note
  • Including too much detail in the note beyond what is needed
  • Using subjective or overly descriptive language in the note
  • Failing to close a door in future notes that was opened in an earlier note

In addition to discussing what not to do, Dr. Van Brunt will share over a dozen examples of well-written notes to be used as templates and guides when staff are addressing suicidal behavior, non-compliance with interventions, referrals for mental health or academic support, inclusion of dissenting or opinions in managing the case, and how to include third party documentation.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • BIT members
  • Threat assessment professionals
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Case Managers
  • Counseling staff
  • Student Life staff

Click here.

Best Practices in Program Evaluation
Co-Sponsored by ATIXA and SCOPE
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Join Dr. Van Brunt as he offers a straightforward and practical review of program evaluation for student affairs professionals. Whether your task is the assessment of programs in compliance with the new Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (SaVE)/Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) or simply to improve demonstrated effectiveness for primary, secondary and tertiary prevention programs to various campus populations, this event is for you.

Drawing on his practical experience as a counseling center director and his graduate teaching of program evaluation and research methods courses, Van Brunt will offer participants detailed examples and take-a-ways demonstrating how to develop research questions from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective, develop an assessment plan, how to create pen and paper as well as online measures, gather and evaluate data and report this information back in an easy to understand format.

Whether you run a counseling center, present on prevention, offer student activity programming or promote health education, this program will provide you with important advice and guidance to better assess your programming efforts.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Health and Wellness staff
  • Prevention educators

Click here.

Navigating the Intersection of FERPA and Title IX
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

Presenter:  Brett A. Sokolow, J.D.

Training Description

Title IX prohibits gender inequity, discrimination and sexual harassment on college campuses.  FERPA governs the privacy of student education records. Campuses have an obligation to respond promptly and effectively to claims that fall within Title IX while also protecting privacy as assured by FERPA.  When the two laws conflict and intersect, we need an online training to help us to navigate toward best practices.

Professionals across the nation are struggling to protect student rights and fulfill the duty of Title IX compliance. This online training will explore the answers to some common questions, examine the interplay between FERPA and Title IX, and provide professionals with a road map for moving forward.

Specifically, this online training will address the following questions:

  • What does guidance from the Office for Civil Rights say about the intersection of Title IX and FERPA?
  • Respondent access to the complaint – do’s and don’ts
  • When can sharing information about a Title IX Investigation violate FERPA or Title IX’s own confidentiality mandate?
  • Gag orders and the need to maintain confidentiality under Title IX
  • What are best practices for FERPA consents in Title IX cases?
  • How do I balance a student’s rights under FERPA with my Title IX investigation and reporting obligations?
  • During a pending investigation, what information can I provide, to whom and what needs to be redacted because of FERPA?
  • Sharing a copy of the investigation report – do’s and don’ts
  • Redisclosure of FERPA information in a Title IX complaint
  • What rights of access do students have to investigation records, according to FERPA?
  • How should we address student rights under FERPA when a student accusation is made against an employee?
  • How do FERPA, Title IX and appeal rights intersect?
  • Defining final results per VAWA Section 304
  • Sharing of outcomes – how much, when, in what form, and with what content?

Join Title IX expert Brett A. Sokolow, Esq., as he discusses recommendations provided by OCR, the Department of Education Family Policy Compliance Office, and ATIXA.  He will highlight identified best practices and provide guidance for assuring your campus is meeting the obligations of compliance.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event, in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train additional staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend?

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Residential life staff
  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Title IX Investigators
  • Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Office staff

Click here.

Addressing Risk Management in Study Abroad Programs
Co-Sponsored by ATIXA and NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Saundra Schuster, J.D. and Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Study abroad programs have increased in attendance to over 300,000 students in the past year now studying abroad. Join Saunie Schuster and Brian Van Brunt as they discuss ways to reduce the risk to the institution and students involved in the program from both a legal and mental health perspective.

Learn the importance of:

  • Prevention and getting out in front of conflicts and problems
  • The role of prescreening for applicants (using multiple departments)
  • Orientation to host country (awareness of travel alerts and warnings)
  • Training of faculty and staff
  • Understanding host country services and infrastructure
  • Health care, evacuation/kidnapping insurance
  • Communication with parents and third parties
  • Awareness of common problems experienced by students
  • Addressing mental health crisis events

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • International Student and Scholar Services staff
  • Vice Presidents of Student Affairs
  • Deans of Students
  • Title IX Coordinators and Investigators
  • General Counsel
  • Risk Management
  • Faculty and department chairs
  • Academic affairs
  • Student tutoring staff
  • Academic advising staff
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

How To Manage, Supervise & Energize Difficult Staff: A Proactive Approach
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and Poppy Fitch

Training Description

Negative student behavior isn’t the only concern on today’s college campuses. Staff can be difficult, too. Whether you are attempting to manage someone with a poor work ethic or a staff member that needs constant praise, when negative behavior is presented in the office environment, it can quickly bring down the entire team.

Join Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Poppy Fitch as they outline common staff difficulties that can negatively affect a healthy community, service, and an otherwise efficient office. Van Brunt and Fitch describe these behaviors and personality traits as Poor Work Ethic, Over-Achiever, Needing Praise, Checked-Out, Boundary Problems, Contrary and Argumentative, Quiet and Lacking Initiative, and Strong Start; Lousy Finish. They all have the potential to reduce the effectiveness of job performance and create problems in day-to-day time management. When it becomes difficult to complete everyday tasks and nearly impossible to energize staff to begin new projects and develop a personal responsibility for a high quality of achievement, you know you have a problem. Participants will leave this program with suggestions for how to approach staff and manage these common problems over time to ensure compliance.

Participants will:

  • Understand why and how staff can negatively affect a healthy community, customer service and the quality of work being done in your office or department
  • Outline the most common staff difficulties and specific scenarios of each
  • Learn how to proactively approach staff when a negative behavior is presented
  • Discover how to energize staff and increase motivation to produce high quality work
  • Manage common problems and difficult behaviors over time to ensure compliance

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • Vice Presidents of Student Affairs
  • Deans of Students
  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Health and Wellness staff

Click here.

When Social Media & Title IX Collide: What Colleges Need To Know About Gossip Sites, Free Speech & Proactive Policies
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

Date and Time: December 2nd,  2014 1-2:30pm EST

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and Miranda Perry

Training Description

Social media and its effects are a reality for every college student. Unfortunately, social media is not always used for the common good. When abused for the purpose of spreading rumors, gossip and hateful language across campus, student conduct officers, counselors, and student affairs administrators are faced with a wide array of serious challenges. Despite the fall of the behemoth Juicy Campus, students continue to post pictures and messages on a variety of sites such as College Wall of Shame, CollegiateACB, Campus Gossip and Little Gossip. Where is the line between free speech and threatening, slanderous language? When is it a community disruption? What are the Title IX considerations?

Consider the following scenarios:

  • A student comes into the conduct office to complain about another student who has posted insults about them on Yik-Yak and Facebook. They demand you do something.
  • A student posts a picture of another student on a college gossip site and this results in a suicide attempt.
  • A faculty member expresses concern to her dean about sexually offensive information placed on www.ratemyprofessor.com.
  • A group of students create a website about an “odd” student on their residence hall floor who they think might be the country’s next campus shooter. They see this as a public service to the community. The targeted student comes into counseling and is considering suicide.
  • A student posts threats online such as “If Professor Van Brunt doesn’t get his head out of his *&%, I’m going to do it for him the next time we have class.”

Join Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Miranda Perry as they share challenges and opportunities from the counseling and conduct perspectives. The presenters will use case studies and discuss the social media websites that conduct officers, counseling staff and other administrators should know about. They will also discuss the importance of assessing and addressing threat and danger presented in social media posts.

Objectives:

  • Discuss how a social media post becomes a Title IX issue
  • Explore the ways a student’s right to free speech collides with insulting or slanderous statements towards other campus members
  • Discover ways to address teasing and bullying through the student conduct code
  • Learn the specifics of cyberbullying terminology, usage and the specific gossip websites currently popular among college students
  • Realize that generational diversity (Millennial students, Generation X students, and Baby Boomer administrators) may play a role and needs to be considered

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who Should Attend:

  • Vice Presidents of Student Affairs
  • Deans of Student Life
  • Title IX Coordinators and Investigators
  • General Counsel
  • Faculty and department heads
  • Academic affairs
  • Student conduct officers
  • Counseling staff
  • Residential life staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

Federal Changes In Policy Concerning Suicidal & Dangerous Students: A Review Of Three Legal Cases
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., and Jason Ebbeling, J. D. 

Training Description

The Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR) recently made significant changes in policy that made it more difficult for colleges and universities to avoid missteps, to understand legal liability and to effectively manage outcomes when it comes to suicidal students who present a danger to others on campus. Found under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the revised regulation now deems it unlawful to involuntarily separate, suspend, block readmission or expel a student on the basis of self-harmful or suicidal behaviors.

There have been several recent legal cases that are essential for colleges and universities to understand regarding how OCR is addressing harm-to-self and harm-to-others as it applies to involuntary medical leaves, readmission and avoiding OCR complaints.

These recent cases shed light on the following questions:

  • Does having Asperger’s disorder protect a student from suspension after he threatens a staff member?
  • Once a student is medically withdrawn, what is allowable for a college to require prior to the student’s readmission?
  • Are counseling assessment records private, or are they accessible by the Dean of Students or Vice President of Student Affairs during a crisis?
  • Is an inpatient admission for a suicide attempt grounds for separation from campus?

Join Dr. Brian Van Brunt and Jason Ebbeling as they discuss the psychological, administrative and legal implications of the conditions that these issues bring to campus. This is an advanced topic webinar that will focus on a review of three legal cases and the implications for college and universities as they attempt to make sense out of these new regulations with practical applications. This is a new program that differs greatly from previous programs concerning suicidal students or readmission requirements.

As an NCHERM Group Online Training, those participating will have access to the recording following the live event in order to make the content available to additional staff and faculty. This allows your campus to watch the program on your terms and train staff and faculty as the need arises. The program includes a summary, access to the PowerPoint slides, a list of do’s and don’ts, additional online resources and questions for future discussion.

Who should attend?

  • Two-year & Four-year institutions
  • BIT members
  • Threat assessment professionals
  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Dean of Student Services/Affairs
  • Faculty (full- and part-time)
  • Advising staff
  • Counseling staff
  • Residence Life staff
  • Student Life staff
  • Communications staff

Click here.

How to Advertise your BIT
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Having a good Behavioral Intervention Team or Student of Concern Team, but not telling people how to make reports, is like having a good police or fire department without the 911 method to reach them. BITs need to have a marketing strategy that reaches the students, faculty and staff in order to gather the data needed to drive successful analyses and interventions.

Join Dr. Van Brunt as he shares with you the importance of developing a marketing campaign for your BIT. He will review dozens of practical examples of how BITs across the country adversities their teams through logos, websites, brochures and videos. Drawing on recent national data from the Educational Advisory Board, as well as the NaBITA 2014 BIT survey, this program will demonstrative the benefits to advertising your BIT along with a clear path forward, regardless of budget.

In this program, we will address common concerns such as:

  • If we start advertising our BIT, won’t we be overwhelmed with referrals?
  • We already have so much to do, shouldn’t we worry about marketing later?
  • Won’t this cost an arm and a leg? We don’t have a budget for this!

We will discuss:

  • Research based support from EAB and NaBITA on the rationale behind a strong advertising and marketing campaign
  • The importance of advertising and marketing
  • How to develop a logo, brochure and website for a BIT
  • A review of current logos, websites and video demonstrations
  • How to limit cost and staff time when approaching marketing

Participants will also receive a detailed, ten step planning sheet to develop a marketing and advertising strategy for their BIT.

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review the importance of having a strategic marketing and advertising plan for a BIT to mitigate legal risk and educate the campus community
  • Participants will explore the common and best practice approaches to advertising from dozens of two-year and four-year campuses
  • Participants will discuss how to develop a clear action plan that will not have a high cost to the budget or staff time.

Click here.

Addressing Microaggression and Cultural Issues on the BIT
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

Issues of cultural difference and underserved populations are important aspects of BIT work at all three phases of operations including: (1) gathering data, (2) analysis of behavior and (3) intervention. BITs need to be aware of potential limitations in gathering information and ensuring referrals, as well as taking into account the unique aspects of cultural and special population differences during the analysis and intervention actions by the team.

Join Dr. Van Brunt as he addresses these concepts from the framework of Sue’s (2010) microaggressions and the potential biases and blind spots teams encounter when working with those who are culturally different from the majority population. Special attention will be given to issues of sexual identity, as well as mental illness. The program will include a discussion of the cultural limitations related to psychological and threat assessment.

In this program, we will discuss:

  • Cultural issues that impact the BIT in terms of reporting, psychological testing, notification and inter/intra team communications
  • The definition of microaggressions and how these occur in everyday life
  • How microaggressions impact LGBT individuals, mental health and different cultural groups
  • How power and authority are seen by the community
  • Ways to understand objectification, depersonalization and misogyny
  • Practical applications of theory to adjust BIT operations
  • Issues of cultural difference in regards to psychological testing and threat assessment

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review the cultural issues that impact BIT team functioning.
  • Participants will explore the common ways microaggression impact information gathering, analysis and interventions.
  • Participants will discuss how to develop a clear action plan moving forward to address these issues in their community.

Click here.

 

Implementing the ATIXA One Policy, One Process Model
An overview of the newly revised ATIXA Model Policy and Procedure for Civil Rights Equity Grievance Resolution for all Faculty, Students and Employees, followed by discussion with campuses currently utilizing the model
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

Presenter: Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D.

Training Description

As campuses work diligently to bring processes into compliance with Title IX, some of the more vexing challenges arise in five particular areas:

  • Cross-constituency complaints (student-on-faculty, faculty-on-staff, etc.);
  • Several to many different processes for resolving complaints accusing students, faculty, staff, unionized employees, etc.;
  • Different processes for discrimination complaints than those used to address Title IX-related complaints;
  • Incorporating Title IX equity standards into employee-on-employee complaints;
  • Reconciling complaints that include both Title IX-covered behaviors and those standing outside Title IX.

Given the complexity of addressing these challenges separately — let alone taking on all five simultaneously — many campuses are realizing that Band-Aids on existing processes can work in the short-term, but that it will ultimately be better to address these challenges now with a permanent solution.  But, how do we do so?

In this program, we will discuss:

The One Policy, One Process Approach

ATIXA has developed an approach called the One Policy, One Process Model (1P, 1P for short), based on the idea of a global human dignity resolution process.  This model permits all discrimination complaints (age, race, sex, gender, nationality, etc.) to be resolved using one institution-wide policy, and one stand-alone resolution process, applied to all complaints involving faculty, students and staff.  This process can sit outside existing processes, or can be integrated into existing human resource, affirmative action and student conduct models. It harnesses the existing resources of many departments to minimize the need for added staff and expense. 1P, 1P is not only Title IX compliant, it serves the best practices of the civil rights approach with an emphasis on meaningful remedies, social justice, victim empowerment and advocacy, comprehensive investigation and prompt, humane, non-adversarial resolution of everything from bias incidents to stalking, to rape and intimate partner violence.

What is the Model Policy?

The newly revised ATIXA One Policy, One Process Model is a unified policy addressing sexual misconduct and other forms of discrimination. The Model covers everyone equally with the same kind and degree of protection of their rights.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain an overview of the newly revised One Policy, One Process Model
  • Understand from campuses currently utilizing the Model why they chose to implement a unified policy
  • Explore common challenges to implementing a unified policy
  • Review successes of campuses employing a unified policy

For additional information on the One Policy, One Process Model, click here.

Click here.

Counseling and Community Colleges: Doing it Well
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.

Presenter: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

  • Should community colleges offer counseling services?
  • How should counseling staff interact with other departments such as the Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT)?
  • How can you convince an administration that is against counseling to invest in care?

Join Dr. Van Brunt as he reviews common challenges when providing counseling services on a community college campus. As a past president of the American College Counseling Association (ACCA) and the current president of the National Behavioral Intervention Team Association (NaBITA), he will review best practices for counseling practices and the importance of the connection between counseling and the BIT.

In this program, participants will explore:

  • The importance of correctly defining services in terms of mental health treatment, career counseling, academic counseling and general support
  • Defining the scope of services to the campus community
  • Current trends in counseling on community college campuses through the ACCA community college survey
  • Funding and staffing challenges to adequately meet needs with existing resources
  • Building relationships with the larger community through memorandums of understanding, consulting and building coalitions
  • The importance of working collaboratively with the campus Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT)

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Creating, Implementing and Applying Climate Surveys
Sponsored by ATIXA
Click here.

PresentersDaniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D. and Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Training Description

The Office for Civil Rights and the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault both encourage institutions to regularly assess campus climate via a survey instrument.

The White House has offered a template, national consortia are offering their members newly designed climate surveys, and external providers continue to enter the marketplace in anticipation of federal legislation mandating surveys.

 Some of the existing templates are problematic because they are not research-based, don’t use validated questions, utilize victim-blaming language, offer poor question design, and do not address climate issues holistically. Learn from ATIXA’s top leadership and higher education consultants as they provide guidance on what survey items to include, what topics to cover, sample sizes, statistically significant results, IRB approval, publishing results, and how to analyze the data collected.

In this webinar, the presenters will address common concerns such as:

  • How do we begin the climate survey process?
  • What are the parameters and limitations of a well-designed, useful climate survey tool?
  • How do we translate climate survey findings into action?

We will discuss:

  • The strengths and weaknesses of existing and forthcoming climate survey templates
  • How to develop a specific climate survey for sexual violence versus a holistic climate survey for all civil rights
  • How to best mobilize students, faculty, and staff to be involved in data collection and next steps

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review the current guidance on conducting campus climate surveys
  • Participants will discuss the pros and cons of existing and forthcoming climate survey templates
  • Participants will review how to translate climate survey findings into strategic planning and action steps

Click here.

Key Issues Facing Community Colleges
Sponsored by SACCA
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PresenterW. Scott Lewis, J.D., and Yvette Sweeney

Training Description

Student Affairs practitioners at community colleges are faced with unique challenges, different from traditional institutions. Community college student affairs professionals are tasked with not only addressing the same compliance challenges facing more traditional institutions, but also for providing opportunities for organizational affiliation to a diverse population, creating appropriate academic and behavioral discipline processes and responding to campus threats and violence. In addition to working within a diverse age-based population, community college student affairs professionals also work within a population that is most frequently non-residential, comprised of both full-time students on an academic track to a four year degree as well as adult learners. Many adult learners have full time jobs, families and community commitments with various learning objectives.  Join the Student Affairs Community College Association’s (SACCA) President and Advisory Board member to discuss the impact of different demographics on developing and managing a student affairs division, as well as identify unique challenges and opportunities facing community college practitioners.  Our President and Advisory Board member will provide a discussion on understanding the scope of challenges, as well as provide guidance on addressing strategies for many of the issues that require unique and customized responses.

In this program, we will discuss:

  • How student affairs hot topic issues differ for two-year colleges, identifying the impact of the differing demographics
  • Strategies for addressing federal compliance requirements, behavior intervention and threat assessment, and disciplinary processes within a community college setting
  • Goals and strategies for providing support, professional development and leadership for community and technical college administrators through SACCA
  • How community college student affairs professionals can network to share and learn from best practice models, programs and materials

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will review what sets community college violence, health and safety issues apart from traditional four-year campuses
  • Participants will discuss the application of legislation and pending initiatives to the community college environment
  • Participants will explore opportunities for networking with peers on similar campuses

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Best Practices in Retaining Community College Students to Graduation
Sponsored by SACCA
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Presenter Information:

Dr. Aaron W. Hughey is a Professor in the Department of Counseling and Student Affairs at Western Kentucky University, where he oversees the graduate degree program in Student Affairs in Higher Education. He is also a member of the President’s Task Force on Student Retention at WKU. Before joining the faculty in 1991, he spent 10 years in progressive administrative positions, including five years as the Associate Director of University Housing at WKU. He was also head of the department of Counseling and Student Affairs for five years before returning to the faculty full-time in 2008. Dr. Hughey has degrees from the University of Tennessee at Martin, the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Western Kentucky University, and Northern Illinois University. He has authored (or co-authored) over 50 refereed publications on a wide range of issues including leadership and student development, mental health counseling, marriage and family therapy, standardized testing, diversity and educational administration. He regularly presents at national and international conferences and consults extensively with companies and schools. He also provides training and professional development programs on a variety of topics centered on student success. Enhancing student retention is one of his specialties; he routinely consults with individuals and institutions on this increasingly important topic.

Training Description

“Nationwide community college enrollment numbers continue to decline. But student completion rates in the sector are higher than many people think. Full-time community college students graduate at a rate of 57 percent within six years, according to the report, either from the institution where they originally enrolled or another college. The Clearinghouse’s six-year completion rate for all community college students is 39 percent.” (American Association of Community Colleges, 2015)

“The community college sector has come under increasing pressure to become more efficient, that is, to improve quality without spending more. The sector has responded, and over the past decade, per-student expenditures have fallen by one-tenth and enrollments have increased by over one-third.” (Community College Research Center, 2015)

“Community colleges are intended to be gateways to careers or to four-year colleges offering bachelor’s degrees. Unfortunately, they have very low graduation rates. Just 20 percent of full-time students seeking a degree get one within three years. That number rises to 35 percent after five years, but by then another 45 percent have given up completely and are no longer enrolled. With graduation rates that low, community colleges can be dead ends rather than gateways for students. But an initiative at the City University of New York shows enormous promise for improving graduation rates at community colleges. The program, Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), nearly doubled the share of students graduating within three years (to 40 percent from 22 percent). ASAP also increased the share enrolling in a four-year college (to 25 percent from 17 percent), so it may also, in time, increase the share earning a bachelor’s degree.” (New York Times, 2015)

“Research has identified several ways for colleges that enroll lesser-prepared students to improve their graduation rates. But college leaders are often wary of those solutions, because they can take a whack at the bottom line and challenge a tradition of open doors.” ((Inside Higher Education, 2015)

Join your colleagues from across the country as we explore best practices in promoting retention to graduation for community college students — and learn how strategies that work can be customized and adapted to your own campus. This will be an interactive webinar where you will learn current, evidence-based best practices associated with enhancing community college student persistence to graduation. We’ll explore successful programs and initiatives in student persistence to graduation, as well as concrete recommendations as to how these services and activities can be successfully implemented in a variety of higher education environments. Equal emphasis will be placed on helping both institutions as well as individual students achieve their mutually-complementary objective: graduation.

Participants will learn:

  • Why graduation is increasingly important for community colleges, the students they serve, and society at large.
  • The various factors that contribute to community college student persistence to graduation (including academic preparation, social integration, institutional support, and financial considerations).
  • What can be done prior to community college students’ arrival on campus that will increase their probability of persistence to graduation, and how that should complement and reinforce what is done once they are on campus.
  • How to identify potentially ‘at-risk’ community college students and how to effectively intervene with these students in an integrated and effective manner.
  • Strategies that work – and those that don’t – with specific community college student populations.
  • Methods that develop and foster institutional support for community college persistence initiatives, including how to enhance faculty support and participation in persistence to graduation initiatives.
  • Ways to include parents in supporting their community college student toward a college degree and why this is especially critical to the current generation of college students.
  • How to develop a comprehensive community college student retention plan that puts everyone at the institution on the same page with respect to their retention efforts.

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Conducting Hazing Investigations
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Presenter: Gentry McCreary, Ph.D.

Investigating organizational hazing cases can be among the most difficult tasks faced by college and university administrators. These cases are often complex, involving many moving parts, misinformation and obfuscation. Successfully investigating and adjudicating these cases requires skilled, well-trained investigators who are able to cut through the shroud of secrecy in order to find the truth.

This webinar will provide participants with a step-by-step approach to investigating these cases. Participants will develop a better understanding of the cultural fixtures of closed student groups, will learn how to lay out and plan an investigation, and will learn a variety of proven questioning techniques aimed at getting to the truth of the situation.

The presenter, Dr. Gentry McCreary, is widely regarded as an expert in the areas of hazing prevention and investigation. He has investigated hazing cases on multiple campuses, has trained both hazing and Title IX investigators, and his award-winning research has examined the environmental variables that influence hazing cultures.

Participant Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will develop a basic understanding of the psychology of hazing in student organizations.
  • Participants will learn how to structure campus policy in order to promote effective hazing investigation/adjudication.
  • Participants will learn effective investigation and questioning techniques.
  • Participants will learn how to effectively structure and produce hazing investigation reports.

Click here.

Developing and Assessing BIT Structure and Function: An Online Discussion
Sponsored by NaBITA
Click here.
Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., W. Scott Lewis, J.D., Aaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D.

When working with Behavioral Intervention Teams, three central questions arise most commonly at our trainings and conference. These questions are:

  • What departments should regularly attend the team meetings? What are the roles each department should play on the team?
  • Do you have some sample mission statements or advice to help us when we are creating or updating our team’s mission or vision statement?
  • How should we assess our team’s actions for effectiveness?

This online training offers answers to each of these questions for teams just starting out or teams that have been in existence for several years and are struggling with issues of team membership and developing or updating a mission statement. We also address the growing question of how to assess the work a team is doing and how to better benchmark our data for comparison and improvement in future years.

Join Scott Lewis, Brian Van Brunt and Aaron Reese— the past, current and future NaBITA presidents, as they discuss these key issues.

We recommend sharing the following white papers prior to the recording in order better prepare your training group for the online discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will review the importance of ensuring your team membership lines up with national standards and when local needs should create an exception to allow or remove a department from the BIT.
  • Participants will discuss sample mission statements and how to ensure their mission or vision statement fully addresses the scope and nature of their team
  • Participants will review ten core areas used in assessing a team’s effectiveness and discuss ways to review and update their own BITs process.

Click here.

Consent and Blackouts: The Legal, Psychological and Prevention Perspectives
Sponsored by ATIXA
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Presenters: Brett A. Sokolow, Esq. and Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D.

Join Brett A. Sokolow, Esq. and Dr. Brian Van Brunt as they discuss the issues complicating consent when a student experiences a blackout, whether en bloc or fragmentary.  Blackout or brownouts are characterized by an inability or difficulty to recall the past as the result of alcohol or other drug use. Can a student give consent at one point and then fail to recall this later? What about students who are physically unresponsive, but have clear recall? How does a blackout’s block on memory affect capacity to consent? How should the campus resolution process handle such a case?

Through an interactive and dynamic discussion, the presenters will first review the latest literature and research, providing the definitions of blackout and brownout from the legal, student conduct and psychological/medical perspectives. They will discuss two case studies and provide an opportunity for questions and further exploration of the topic. The program will conclude with a review of ways to teach students prevention techniques related to this topic.

We will review:

  • The nature of consent
  • Legal issues related to blackout/brownout and consent
  • Psychological and medical issues related to blackout/brownout and consent
  • Discussion of two cases related to blackout and brownout drinking
  • Discussion of prevention issues related to teaching consent as it relates to blackout and brownout drinking or substance use

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Title IX Investigations and Technology: Eight Emerging and Common Issues
Sponsored by ATIXA
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Presenters: Brett A. Sokolow, J.D., and Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D.

Presenters will explore eight emerging and common issues in how technology is changing the investigation landscape:

  1.  How students, faculty and staff are communicating using technology
  2.  How technology is changing the rubric – More pervasive and persistent
  3. Recent trends for using technology to assist in Title IX Investigations
  4. Knowing and understanding popular dating and hook up apps
  5. Understanding anonymous online harassment or discrimination
  6. Using text messages, photos, videos and e-mails as evidence
  7. Accessing phone records, deleted social media, deleted texts
  8. Technology cheats, including fake texts, altered images, etc.

Participants will gain a stronger understanding of these eight issues as well as hands-on tips for improving and appropriately addressing Title IX investigations that involve technology.

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Title IX and Transgender Issues
Sponsored by ATIXA
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Presenter: Erin Buzuvis, J.D.

Title IX prohibits discrimination “on the basis of sex” in federally-funded educational institutions. And while the statute does not contain express provisions regarding discrimination against transgender students and employees, “on the basis of sex” is being interpreted more frequently in ways that embrace the law’s applicability to transgender plaintiffs.  This program will describe the current state of the law, including the apparent conflict between the Department of Education’s current position on transgender rights under Title IX and the more narrow interpretation that a handful of lower federal courts have adopted in transgender rights cases under Title IX.  Participants will navigate this developing area of law towards objectives not limited to compliance and risk-management, but best inclusive practices as well.

Specific areas of coverage include:

  • Admissions and single sex institutions
  • Sexual harassment
  • Bathrooms, locker rooms, dormitories
  • Athletics
  • Religiously affiliated colleges and universities

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain competency in the use and understanding of relevant terms and concepts like transgender, gender identity, etc.
  • Participants will understand relevant legal background that has laid the foundation for contemporary interpretations of Title IX that include or overlap with discrimination against transgender individuals.
  • Participants will be able to anticipate the expectations of the Department of Education with respect to Title IX compliance obligations of nondiscrimination and inclusion of transgender students and employees,
  • Participants will examine Title IX’s application to a variety of issues of interest within higher education, including Admissions and single sex institutions, Sexual harassment; bathrooms, locker rooms, and dormitories;  athletics; and religiously affiliated colleges and universities
  • Through this examination, they will understand what is required from a standpoint of compliance and risk management, as well as what it means to engage in best inclusive practices.

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Implementing BITs Across a Multi-Campus Institution
Sponsored by NaBITA and SACCA
Click here.

Presenter:
Adrian Rodriguez, M.Ed., Vice President for Student Development Services, Tarrant County College, Trinity River Campus

When discussing the implementation of a behavioral intervention team approach at a multi-campus institution, there are many questions that are often asked:

  • How do I get started?
  • Should we have one team for the college or a separate team per campus?
  • How do we gain support and buy-in from faculty, campus administration, college/district administration?
  • Who should serve on our committee? Should it include HR, Legal, Police?
  • How do we create a culture of reporting across campuses?
  • How should we determine to mandate assessment or treatment, and how do we ensure consistency in our practices across our institution?
  • How should the BIT align with the student conduct process?
  • We don’t have a case manager dedicated to BIT across campuses, how should this be done college-wide?

This online training will explore all of these questions and will address many other major considerations when instituting a BIT at a multi-campus institution. We will further discuss the challenges of institutionalization based on specific institutional types, as well as identify ways to overcome barriers and obstacles on your way to successful BIT implementation.

Join Adrian Rodriguez, current Board member of NaBITA and SACCA, as he explores these key considerations for multi-campus institutions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will discuss strategic planning efforts to create an organized approach to effective implementation
  • Participants will discuss how to engage the right stakeholders to ensure the support necessary for an effective BIT
  • Participants will discuss policy and process review necessary to ensure that the BIT approach is supported by institutional policy and practice
  • Participants will discuss how to promote a culture of reporting, an essential key to effective BIT work
  • Participants will discuss the challenges and opportunities that exist in instituting a BIT at a multi-campus institution.

Click here.

 

Breaking Down Silos in Case Management
Sponsored by NaBITA
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Presenters
: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D. and JJ Larson

Join JJ Larson, the president of the Higher Education Case Managers Association (HECMA) and Brian Van Brunt, executive director of the National Behavioral Intervention Team Association (NaBITA) as they discuss the importance of case management on campus and how to can break down silos among various departments to improve communication and allow for a higher quality of care for students.

During this 90-minute program, the speakers will provide the audience with a foundational understanding of case management and how it is most commonly applied at both community/technical colleges, as well as four year institutions. There will be a discussion of the key departments to which case managers connect students around campus and how to overcome potential barriers to collaboration. They will also cover the various restrictions found in the common laws and guidelines governing communication (FERPA, HIPAA, state confidentiality law, etc).

During this program, participants will review:

  • Basics of case management
  • Ways to reduce silos among departments
  • Laws and guidelines governing communication
  • How and where to create case management on campus
  • Discussion of record keeping and documentation

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Preventing Burnout by Fostering Compassion Satisfaction among Title IX Administrators
Sponsored by ATIXA
Purchase here.

Presenter: LB Klein, MSW, MPA

Training Description

How can you stay in this work for the long haul or promote the wellbeing of your staff? Title IX administrators are particularly vulnerable to scrutiny and liability and professionals may encounter a steep learning curve in this relatively new role. These challenges coupled with being regularly confronted with the realities of the pervasiveness of trauma in their communities, leave these professionals particularly prone to burnout, a psychological syndrome that involves a prolonged response to chronic interpersonal stressors on the job.  This webinar will explore how to foster compassion satisfaction or the ability to receive gratification from their roles dealing with traumatized individuals and communities. It is based on a study, funded with an ATIXA research grant, which combined extensive interdisciplinary research with interviews and surveys of current Title IX administrators. Implications for employees, supervisors, university communities, and the field will be discussed.

Participants will be able to:

  • List components of burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction.
  • Identify strategies to prevent burnout and foster compassion satisfaction at individual, relationship, community, and profession-wide levels.
  • Discuss how the Title IX administrator role can impact personal and professional wellbeing.
  • Articulate implications from a study of Title IX administrator compassion satisfaction and fatigue.

Who Should Attend:

  • Student Affairs administrators
  • Supervisors of Title IX Coordinators, investigators, and other staff
  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Title IX investigators
  • Athletics administrators, Senior Administrators, and compliance administrators

Purchase here.

Campus Survivor Advocacy
Sponsored by ATIXA
Purchase here

Presenters: LB Klein, MSW & Jyl Shaffer, MA

Training Description

Institutions across the country are seeing a marked increase in the number of students who are seeking help after experiencing interpersonal violence during their time on campus. Research and best practice document that confidential advocates improve survivors’ experience when accessing support or seeking a resolution. VAWA regulations now require that student complainants and respondents have access to an advisor of their choice throughout the campus reporting process. Pending federal legislation and OCR guidance both point to the availability of confidential advisors as a best practice for campuses. While every college and university in the country is required by the Department of Education to have a campus Title IX Coordinator, each institution may soon be required to provide a confidential advisor for student survivors as well, either a designated university employee or a contracted local community service provider.

This program will discuss the robust history of campus survivor advocacy, considerations for creating a campus-based program and/or contracting community advocates, and how privilege and confidentiality factor into the advocate role. We will also discuss the importance of ensuring there are well-trained advocates available for survivors of all VAWA crimes including sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking, as well as how to center survivors holding marginalized identities.

Participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the historical context of campus advocacy
  • List the specific laws and regulations impacting campus advocacy, including confidentiality and privilege
  • Identify the rights of a survivor
  • Describe the role of a campus-based or campus-serving advocate
  • Discuss how advocacy programs can center students with marginalized identities
  • Define key terms utilized in advocacy contexts

Who Should Attend:

  • University-employed campus advocates
  • Community-based domestic violence advocates working with college student populations
  • Community-based sexual assault advocates working with college student populations
  • Student Affairs administrators who oversee advocacy programs
  • Title IX investigators who wish to understand the role of campus advocates in the investigative process
  • Athletics administrators, Senior Administrators, and compliance administrators
  • Campus law enforcement

Purchase here.

A Deep Dive on Mandated Reporting Do’s and Don’ts
Sponsored by ATIXA
Purchase here

Presenters: Brett A. Sokolow, Esq. and Daniel C. Swinton, Ed.D.

Training Description

Three federal laws create reporting responsibilities for campus employees, faculty, and professional staff to:

  • Ensure appropriate services to victims of sexual violence
  • Foster transparency about campus crimes
  • Permit the institution to appropriately remedy discrimination and harassment

Join the foremost experts on mandated reporter compliance to learn how to best respond as an institution. This topic and format are useful for trainer training and for direct training of employees on their mandated reporter responsibilities.

Purchase here.

 

What’s in a Name: The Role Counselors, Advisors and Clinicians Play on Campus
Sponsored by NaBITA
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Presenters: Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., and W. Scott Lewis, J.D.

Training Description:

What do you think of when you hear the word ‘counselor’? For some, this evokes an image of mental health professionals who provide treatment for issues such as depression or anxiety. For others, you may think of a supportive staff member who helps college students through academic, personal, financial, and other stressful events they experience at college. Still others may think of an admissions staff member, a lawyer (general counsel), or someone who offers tutoring.

NaBITA has been following the broadening of the term counselor and this online program will offer some clarity in how to approach the issue of various counselors, mental health treatment providers, and academic support staff on campus.

Following the program, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the technical definition of counselors based on the American Counseling Association
  • Review other forms of support that fall into the non-mental health categories
  • Discuss how these differences impact communication, conditionality, privilege, and the risk of lawsuits
  • Explore ways to clarify differences at the start of service delivery to students

Purchase here.

Coaching for the BIT Chair
Sponsored by NaBITA
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Presenter: Chip Reese, Ed. D.

Training Description:

BIT leadership is a crucial element for a high-functioning and successful BIT. Even the most experienced BIT Chair needs coaching and development related to the fundamentals of team leadership. Dr. Chip Reese, Associate NaBITA Executive Director, shares tips and experiences from many years of BIT leadership, and serves up an array of information for current and emerging BIT chairs to improve overall team functions.

The role of BIT Chair can feel unique among other campus leadership positions. In this 60-minute webinar, participants will explore the challenges of BIT leadership, attributes of effective BIT leaders, and specific techniques and strategies for improving team dynamics. From helping BIT chairs better understand the essentials of behavioral intervention work to exploring the tools available for a BIT chair to perform their role, this webinar will guide participants through common BIT challenges and case scenarios with team leadership implications. This coaching session will help your team perform at a higher level and improve your experience as chair of the BIT.

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Key Components of an Online BIT
Sponsored by NaBITA
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Presenter: Chip Reese, Ed. D. and Joseph Allen

Training Description:

As schools continue to expand their online course offerings, it is important that institutions are able to provide the appropriate support for ending, preventing, and mitigating the impact of online threatening and concerning behaviors. In this training, Dr. Reese & Dr. Allen discuss the importance of developing a solid vision and mission for an online BIT, team membership and roles, available tools and resources, and processes to fulfill this much-needed role. As institutions strive to be proactive and prevent escalating online behaviors, it is critical that they understand the tools available to them and the best practices for behavior intervention and threat assessment responses in the online environment. Through the use of examples and scenarios, the presenters share how institutions should not assume any additional level of safety simply based on the perceived anonymity of being online. 

Practical Takeaways

  • An understanding of the makeup and responsibilities for an online BIT
  • Awareness of data sources for gathering information surrounding online threats
  • An overview of the NaBITA D-Scale and mobile application
  • List of data points for tracking threatening and concerning behavior
  • Examples of online threats
  • Library of useful and informative resources available

  Learning Objectives

  • Participants will be able to create framework to build their online BIT
  • Participants will understand online communication channels, tools, and processes for mitigating online threats
  • Participants will understand the range and scope of online threats
  • Participants will understand key departments needed for supporting online students, faculty, and staff
  • Participants will remember the tools available to assist in threat assessment 

Who Should Attend

  • Online Institution administrators
  • Student Affairs Leadership
  • Student Conduct
  • Behavior Intervention Team (BIT) members
  • Counseling Office
  • Human Resources
  • Dispute Resolution
  • Campus security/police
  • Institutional technology personnel

Purchase here.

Beyond Yes/No: Queer, Trans and Kink Perspectives on Sexual Consent
Sponsored by ATIXA
Purchase here

Presenters: Erica Misako Boas, Ph.D. and Jason Laker, Ph.D.

Training Description:

Sexual coercion and assault rates have stagnated for 60 years, despite intense and creative efforts to prevent it. Given the complexity of issues and causal variables, any approach that has hope to make a difference must be similarly multifaceted. The legalistic demands of students to memorize policy definitions of consent, and to ensure enthusiastic verbal agreement in their intimate encounters, is an understandable but problematic approach to reducing coercion and assault. The oft-repeated mantra to “meet students where they’re at” hasn’t been effectively practiced in approaching these problems, interfering with opportunities to build capacity for sexual agency. Since 2012, the presenters of this training have been engaged in an innovative program of research about how sexual consent communication and negotiation actually occurs in practice among college students of many social identities. In this session, we will share new findings and implications from interviews with students who are LGBTQ, and/or who engage in Kink practices. These identities and practices are often marginalized, stigmatized, and/or invisible in research, programmatic, and policy considerations. We will share findings from the remarkable narratives provided by our LGBTQ and Kink-practicing student participants. Their perspectives on, and experiences with, consent communication are incredibly valuable toward building capacity for sexual agency among students across social identities.

In this program, we will discuss:

  • An overview of a promising line of research focused on students’ belief systems and intimate lived experiences of sexuality and consent.
  • Conflicts between legal/policy expectations and intimate experiences of students’ amorous and sexual encounters.
  • A review of provocative, yet critical, issues and students’ beliefs about sexual consent that conflict with popular approaches and practices to prevention.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain ideas for building students’ capacity for empowered sexual consent, negotiation, and/or refusal.
  • Participants will receive foundational information useful for engaging students in reflections about their early learning about sexuality and its impact on their social/sexual experiences in college.
  • Participants will become familiar with LGBTQ and Kink-engaged students’ approaches to consent, and implications for consent and sexual agency, more generally.

Purchase here.

Transitions in Higher Education:
Issues and Best Practices to Support Transgender and Non-Binary Students in Higher Education
Sponsored by ATIXA
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Presenters:  Kimberly A. Gertner, J.D. & Leya Nelson, J.D.

Training Description:

According to a 2011 National Transgender Discrimination Survey, conducted by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality examining higher education experiences (college, graduate school, professional school or technical school), 35% reported harassment and bullying by students, teachers and staff 5% reported physical assault, 3% reported sexual assault, and 2% reported expulsion due to their gender identity and expression.

Further, the Survey found that students identifying as transgender or expressing gender-non conformity while pursuing higher education reported other barriers to full participation such as denial of campus housing, denial of gender appropriate housing, and denial of appropriate bathroom facilities. Lambda Legal’s 2012 Protected and Served survey also found that 20% of transgender respondents 18-24 found campus police, the very officers dedicating to protecting students, “hostile” towards them. Unsurprisingly then given the scope of the problem, supporting trans students in higher education has increasingly become the focus of campus administrators, campus activism, state legislation, and federal administrative guidance and lawsuits.

In this session, we will share insight from campus administrators whose schools have been commended for their trans-friendly practices. We discuss a hypothetical case study to explore the ways in which an institution can support a student during their transition in various settings that affect the student’s college experience. This fictional case study will draw from real examples of challenges faced by transitioning students. We will address the current legal landscape, including key cases and recent guidance from the Office for Civil Rights. Detailed attention will be given on practical guidance on inclusive practices in each significant area of campus life including facilities, campus housing, records, health services, athletics, and Greek life. The presentation will conclude by offering some best inclusive practices that attendees can take back to their respective campuses.

Who Should Attend:

  • Title IX Coordinators & Deputy Coordinators
  • Title IX Investigators
  • Prevention Educators
  • Victim Advocates
  • Campus Safety Personnel
  • General Counsel
  • Student Conduct Officers
  • Residence Life Staff
  • Counseling/Health Staff

Purchase here.

Overview of the Four NaBITA Tools
Sponsored by NaBITA
Purchase here.

Join Dr. Amy Murphy and Dr. Brian Van Brunt as they share with you a review of how the four NaBITA Tools interact with each other. This foundational session is useful for teams new to NaBITA’s threat assessment process and wanting to learn more about the intersectionality and application of the various assessment measures.

NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool

The NaBITA Threat assessment tool was created in 2009 and updated in 2014 as a broad triage process to rate mental health concerns, hostility and violence risks and the generalized risk rubric (mild, moderate, elevated, severe and extreme).

The Violence Risk Assessment of the Written Word

The VRAW2 was created in 2015 following increasing number where college students shared concerning written communication through social media, creative writing classes and over email. The VRAW2 offers five factors (Fixation and Focus, Hierarchical Thematic Content, Action and Time Imperative, Pre-Attack Planning and Injustice Collecting).

The Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35)

The SIVRA-35 was developed in 2012 is an expert system; structured set of items useful for those staff and faculty who work in higher education to use with individuals who may pose a threat to the community. The SIVRA-35 is a guided structured interview useful for classifying risk into low, moderate, and high categories based on the threat and violence risk assessment literature.

The Extremist Risk Intervention Scale (ERIS) (formally R3)

The Extremist Risk Intervention Scale (ERIS) is the newest of the NaBITA tools and offers practical scoring tool useful for those on Behavioral Intervention Teams, law enforcement, and counter-terrorism teams to assess and intervene with extremist and terrorist violence.

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A Developmental Framework for a Code of Student Conduct: The NCHERM Group Model Code Project Online Training Series

In service to the field, this series is being offered free of charge. Purchasers will receive access to the recording. Trainings are 60 minutes each. Click here to purchase. What’s Different Between The NCHERM Group Model Code and Other Codes? Model Code Walk Through: Policy Model Code Walk Through: Procedures

What’s Different Between The NCHERM Group Model Code and Other Codes This is part of a free series. Click here.

Presenters: Brett Sokolow, J.D. and W. Scott Lewis, J.D. Training Description In this, the first of our online trainings detailing the NCHERM Group Model Developmental Code of Conduct Project, we focus on how the NCHERM Group’s model code is different from previous model codes of conduct.  In addition to detailing how this model differs, we’ll explore why each distinction is important to the evolution of the campus conduct process.  Key distinctions reviewed in this online training are detailed below, and then we’ll take your questions.

  • We aimed to write a model that stemmed the tide of legalistic codes by putting the developmental voice first, while still quietly heeding the necessary legal underpinnings of conduct codes;
  • Our rules were focus-grouped with students, for we too often seek to govern their conduct without their input;
  • We drafted a code as a tool of education, prevention, social justice, and community-building as much as a retrospective gauge of whether misconduct has occurred;
  • We deeply imbued this model with the values, mission, and ethos held dear within institutions of higher education;
  • We offered clear expectations, well-defined terms, and elegantly simplified procedures;
  • We developed language that is policy-based, rather than legalistic and archaic (to wit, the words “shall” and “charge” have been banished);
  • This model’s flexibility takes us away from an era of rigid procedural frameworks to better allow our developmental and educational aims to inculcate mature decision-making and guide our students to better align their actions with their values;
  • We sought to create a model that embraces social justice as a hallmark of a document rooted in the origins and the now of the civil-rights movement;
  • We wanted a model that could lean heavily toward conflict resolution mechanisms and investigation function;
  • This model fundamentally reimagines the appeals process that on too many campuses is either broken or increasingly dysfunctional.

Click here.

Model Code Walk Through: Policy
This is part of a free series.
Click here.

Presenters:  W. Scott Lewis, J.D. and Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D.

Training Description

The NCHERM Group, LLC, in concert with its affiliates and other Higher Education professionals recently unveiled a new Developmental Model Code (http://modelcode.wikia.com). This project was borne from intense internal debate within The NCHERM Group about the merits of model codes as a concept. The NCHERM Group and other colleagues, who collectively have written more than seventy-five codes of conduct for various colleges and universities (and revised hundreds more), wrote it to assist colleges in having a template that was not overly legalistic, but met the necessary compliance criteria.  The goal was to have one that focused on student learning and development, and left the option to the professionals to adapt the document to their culture. Finally, it was written and released in a fashion that allows it to be organic; to grow and develop as the field and the law do. There are two major sections of the document: Policy and Procedure. In this Online Training, the presenters will examine some of the policies that have proven the most challenging – not only in the development of this document, but also in the codes that we have written and revised over the years. We invite participants to bring their policy questions for Q&A at the end of the session. W. Scott Lewis, J.D. and Daniel C. Swinton, Ed.D, J.D., are co-authors of the Code, and bring experience as both practitioners on single campuses (public and private, 2 and 4 year), as well as assisting multiple types of campuses in adopting and adapting new codes. Join them in addressing not just the issues they know exist, but the ones that your campus is struggling with.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Student conduct officers
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members

Click here.

  Model Code Walk Through: Procedures
This is part of a free series.
Click here.

Presenters:  W. Scott Lewis, J.D.

Training Description

The NCHERM Group, LLC, in concert with its affiliates and other Higher Education professionals recently unveiled a new Developmental Model Code (http://modelcode.wikia.com).  This project was borne from intense internal debate within The NCHERM Group about the merits of model codes as a concept. The NCHERM Group and other colleagues, who collectively have written more than seventy-five codes of conduct for various colleges and universities (and revised hundreds more), wrote it to assist colleges in having a template that was not overly legalistic, but met the necessary compliance criteria.  The goal was to have one that focused on student learning and development, and left the option to the professionals to adapt the document to their culture. Finally, it was written and released in a fashion that allows it to be organic; to grow and develop as the field and the law do. There are two major sections of the document: Policy and Procedure. The procedural section is the most progressive and forward–looking, adopting elements of a civil rights investigative model of adjudicating student conduct violations.  In this Online Training, we will examine these procedures: walking the participants thorough a case, from Incident to Adjudication (with a discussion of appeals, time permitting).  We invite participants to bring their procedure questions for Q&A at the end of the session. W. Scott Lewis, J.D. is a co-author of the Code, and brings experience as both a practitioner on single campuses, as well as assisting multiple types of campuses in adopting and adapting new codes. Join him in addressing not just the issues they know exist, but also the ones that your campus is struggling with.

Who Should Attend:

  • VPSAs and Deans
  • General Counsel
  • Student conduct officers
  • Residential life staff
  • Disability services staff
  • Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) members